Tips on how to provide a secure public WiFi hotspot – Part 3

February 4, 2016

This the last part of the the series “tips on how to provide a secure public WiFi hotspot”. In the first two parts we concentrated on the wireless and layer 2 and 3 part, this time we take a look at the application layer stuff you should tune to provide a secure hotspot.

Captive Portal and non HTTP traffic

If you want or need to show the user a website before he is able to surf the web, you should not only think about redirecting HTTP to your landing page.  You should reject (send an ICMP error) for all other TCP connection attempts. Why? Many pages are nowadays HTTPS and letting the user wait for a time-out is not nice. Sure technical minded user will not wait, but others may do. Sure this is not a security advice but an usability one. But it does work nice together with following: Don’t try to provide your own TLS certificate to redirect traffic to the captive portal. Users should not be trained to accept error messages and ignore them and it will give your hotspot an bad look security-wise.

There is just nothing you can do to redirect HTTPS URLs. Just make sure that the captive portal detection of modern operating systems work and so the user is told there is a captive portal.

HTTPS for captive portal

If you require any data from the user except accepting the terms of service your captive portal should be HTTPS.  Get an official DNS name for your portal, e.g. portal.<company>.com and a valid TLS certificate. As there are multiple methods for getting free TLS certificate e.g. startssl or let’s encryt, you should get a real one. One thing that is important to whitelist for your captive portal are the OCSP and CRL URLs of your certificate, issuing CA and root CA. To check for the URLs look at the certificate details for all certificates in the chain of your captive portal. Following images show the 2 places for google.com (you need to check also the Google Internet Authority G2 and GeoTrust Gobal CA in this case.)

crl1

crl2

Why, you ask, you should whitelist these URLs? The browsers will check them before showing your captive portal site. Some/Most browsers will fail open, but some will fail close.

Limit and monitor the DNS

If the user has not past the captive portal his only way though the firewall will be the DNS server. You normally need to resolve the requests to the true IP address to guard against problems with false cached DNS entries after the user past the captive portal. As the user is able to craft the requests as he likes it is possible to send data through to a 3rd party DNS server. This setup can be used as DNS tunnel – it will be not fast but its possible to work through it. As nowadays simple howtos like following and OpenSource tools are provided, consider it easily possible for most power users – its not a expert thing any more.

So now comes the question what you can do against it. In this case you don’t need to block the covert channel of sophisticated malware but just script kiddies that want to tunnel through. Your typical user will only need A and AAAA query types. Tunneling is mostly done via TXT as it allows big packets. Following query types are common:

  • Any
  • A
  • AAAA
  • CNAME
  • MX
  • NS
  • SOA

I won’t go into too much detail, but blocking can be done on the DNS server … e.g. if it is a Windows DNS Server (Allow only certain QTypes) or with the Firewall in this case iptables.

Content Filtering via DNS

Often you’re required to filter certain traffic but don’t want to setup and maintain a transparent proxy or with all the HTTPS it does not help that much any more. An easy way is to use the OpenDNS system, which allows to select certain categories which are then blocked on the DNS level (Query will resolve to an error page) . If you redirect all port 53 traffic to your DNS server which uses the OpenDNS ones as recursive DNS servers you should be good for most cases.

SMTP

Just reject (blocking lets the client run into timeouts) TCP port 25, otherwise infected client systems will flood your bandwidth with SPAM mails.  A mail agent should not send mails to the mail server via port 25 anyway.

I hope this article series helped you and leads to more secure hot spots I’m also able to enjoy. 😉

Decoding SNMPv3 encrypted traffic in Wireshark

January 7, 2016

Talking with fellows about SNMPv3 I hear often that its not that critical that SNMP is encrypted and that encryption makes debugging more complicated as they can’t see what is send over the network.I won’t talk about the need for encrypting SNMP as it is like SSH gets used instead of Telnet. This post shows how easy it is to decode SNMPv3 encrypted messages with Wireshark (if you know the secrets :-) ).  This is possible as SNMPv3 is a simple UDP protocol which encodes the packets with a shared secret and does not use forward secrecy like TLS does.

If you take a look on properly encrypted SNMPv3 traffic it looks like this.

snmpv3_encrypted

Now you just click on “Edit | Preferences”:

wireshark1

Search for “Protocols | SNMP” and click on “User Table | Edit”.

wireshark2

Click onto the “New” button:

wireshark3

 

Now enter your user name, select the authentication and encryption method and provide the 2 passwords. You don’t need to provide the Engine ID normally.

wireshark4

After clicking onto Ok multiple times the traffic looks like this:

snmpv3_decrypted

If you use one SNMP profile for multiple systems its nice that the values get stored in the Wireshark preferences.  Hope this takes some fear away from SNMPv3. :-)

 

 

 

 

Tips on how to provide a secure public WiFi hotspot – Part 2

December 7, 2015

So lets start with tips on how to provide a secure public WiFi hotspot part 2. In the first part we concentrated on the wireless part, this time we take a look at the some layer 2 and 3 stuff you can do to protect your hotspot and your clients.

client 2 client traffic again

Yes, I know I’ve written about hat in the first part. But this was on the wireless side. Many access points block the traffic coming and leaving on the wireless interface but not traffic coming or leaving on the wired side.  So it is possible to think of an attacker finding it’s victims not on the same access point but on others in the same layer 2.  There are multiple way to achieve that once you think about it:

  • Lets assume your client networks are all in 10.0.0/16 and you’re servers are in 10.1.0.0/24. You can simply filter with an ALC on the access points or switches which drop traffic where the source and destination host is within 10.0.0/16.
  • If you’re using a VPN on you’re access points to tunnel the traffic back to a central controller, just don’t bridge/route traffic between them.
  • If it’s one simple layer2 network on one switch, take a look at PVLANs. Many low cost managed switches have this feature.

Enforce DHCP usage

I’ve written a full blog post on why and how to enforce the usage of DHCP in any client network. Its even more important in an public WiFi setting. Following benefits are the most important in this setup:

  • Protection against simple ARP spoofing
  • That a client configures a fix IP address which an other client got via DHCP – be it by accident or malicious act.

Additionally to the example in the linked blog post, here is one where a Mikrotik router is the default gateway and DHCP server in a client network.

Disable the ARP learning on the router
/interface ethernet set 1 arp=proxy-arp

configure the DHCP server to add dynamic ARP entries
/ip dhcp-server set 1 add-arp=yes

Control the uplink bandwidth

This one is not directly a security point, but without it a user can use up all bandwidth and deny other clients access to the internet. I won’t stop long here, just use something similar like the PCQ on Mikrotiks. This will provide a fair distribution between the clients without looking at the traffic itself and classifying it. So you’re within the net neutrally rules if that matters for you.

Management of your devices

Make sure that no management interface of your devices is reachable via the customer/client networks. The easiest way to achieve this is to use a separate management network and make sure the management services of the devices only listen on this network. For access points it could be as easy as using the untagged VLAN to the switch for management and send the client traffic only as tagged traffic to the switch.

If this is not possible in your setup, make a least sure that a local firewall on the devices allow only administration from specify source IP addresses (e.g. the IP of your central management system, or the VPN IP range you use the remotely log into an router).

no default logins and encrypted management

This should be an no-brainer (but I’ll add it here so no one can say it was not on the list), but I’ve seen access points with the SNMP community public in the wild. And choose ssh over telnet and HTTPS over HTTP for management. Won’t write more lines about that basic stuff.

monitor the network traffic

Most routers provide plenty of data via netflow or sflow. Capture that with software like Ntop (open source)  or a commercial offering. Look at the traffic what is normal and what is not. An example for something like this would be if the average packet sizes goes way down for a client it is likely it is scanning something with a tool like nmap or zmap.  ps: Taking a look at the TCP retransmissions also helps to monitor the quality of your service.

After this layer 2 and layer 3 stuff only one part is still open for this series – the application level stuff. Stay tuned.

 

Tips on how to provide a secure public WiFi hotspot – Part 1

December 1, 2015

As I was travelling a little bit in the last few months I came across many public WiFi hotspots and most of them where not that good from a security perspective. So I thought lets write some articles with tips on how to build a secure public WiFi hotspot. This article is not for the end user on how to connect securely to a hotspot, but how to provide a secure hotspot.

The first part of this series talks about the wireless part and how to secure it, following posts will talk about other measures to secure your hotspot. So lets start with the security of the data transmitted over the air.

Encyption of the WiFi Traffic

All most all hotspots I cam across did use unencrypted WiFi , the exception where small hotels which used WPA2 PSK on the SOHO Router and told the guest the password at check in. From a security standpoint using WPA2 PSK with one password for all guest is better than an open network. Why do you ask?

  1. With an open WiFi its trivial to sniff the traffic of other guests and if there are no other protections in the network a man in the middle attack is simply possible. There are really simple to use tools for “normal people” like Firesheep.
  2. With WPA2 PSK each client gets its own session key during the association process. An attacker needs witness the associaton to eavesdrop on the connection. It is possible my an attacker to force a reassociations, by faking a disassociation packet in the name of the target.The disassociation packet attack is an attack at its own, we’ll talk later about it. With Wireshark you can decrypt all traffic if its sees the association process.

So using WP2 PSK is not perfect but its better than nothing. It is even easy to implement in some cases like in a hotel setting. Put the password in the folder in the guest rooms or tell it the customer at check in / arrival – so you can promote your service too.  An other way is to provide two SSIDs one named “Public WLAN open” and one “Public WLAN wps2psk” and tell the user on a captive portal site (if you have/need such an site anyway) to change to the encrypted one for more security.

Ok, that basic security but, you can do better.  Some hotels print a username and password on the receipts which you get on check in. You than need to connect to a insecure wifi and need to enter that in a HTTP website.  Some hotels also just tell you to use room number as username and your family name or your birthday as password, yes again over an insecure network and over HTTP … ok I’ll stop with the rumpling.

If you provide the user already with a custom login – why not use PEAP or EAP-TTLS to secure the log in.  The user chooses the network and gets prompted with an username/password dialog.  For this you need to run an RADIUS server against which the Users authenticates, with FreeRadius, which is provided with all major Linux Distributions, its quite easy, even on embedded devices using with OpenWRT. Such a setup is maybe not the best way for a small hotel, but for a big hotel chain, with a central IT department which already prints the login data on the invoices, this should be easily possible.  And if the marking persists (the legal stuff could be on the invoice .. as nobody reads the backside anyway) on a captive portal page, just make one where the terms of service needs to be accepted and put some nice marketing images there. 😉

There is also a way for you to use WPA2 Enterprise with PEAP / EAP-TTLS and the newer EAP-PWD  if you don’t know the customers and just want to provide a more secure WiFi. Just tell every user the same username / password – as with WAP2 PSK. With FreeRadius its even possible to accept any username / password combinations. With PEAP that works for most clients but not all of them as the returning hash is not correct, but for those the written down username/passwords works.  For example at the biggest European hacker congress from the Chaos Computer Club that setup was used 2 times already with over 9000 attendees.

Just to be sure to tell it. The use of PEAP is not recommend for authenticating users for an internal network (e.g. with BYOD) – Why? It is possible to intercept the wireless traffic using a roque accesspoint using the same (company) SSID-name and tools like freeradius-WPE and cloudcracker.  But for a free / cheep public WiFi it does seem to an common attack route.

At the end of this chapter I’ll provide you also with a really secure setup (that’s what you want to read if you read my blog? Yeah ;-)), which is not that easy to setup but makes sure you know the user which connect to your network – even if its free to use but you’re required to know the user by law.  I’ve not seen this setup in the wild, only told about it by a college.

  1. Provide an open WiFi which only gets you to an HTTPS page where the user can enter his/her phone number
  2. Generate a TLS key/cert in a format the mobile browser accepts and encrypt it with an random password
  3. Send the password via SMS to the user
  4. Let the User download the key/cert
  5. Tell him to connect to the secure WiFi with the certificate.

As told above that’s not easy to do … but secure ;-). You can also provide the decrypt password via the HTTPS page, but than you can’t identify the user, but maybe that’s not necessary in your case. This solution is only workable if the user does this once and uses your Internet connection for a long time. e.g. you provide public Wifi in a public transport vehicle for commuters.  Otherwise I would stick with the WAP2 Enterprise and EAP-TTLS and as compatibility with PEAP.

rouge access points

Rouge access points in this context are devices an attacker normally uses near your hotspots with your SSIDs to get clients to connect to them. Specially if the WiFI is open or only secured with a know WPA2 PSK it’s easy to do so. Clients which have in past already been connected to your network will often connect automatically to the rouge access point using your SSID. If the attacker does a NAT and connects to your hotspot as client most users will not see a difference and their whole network traffic can be intercepted.

Most enterprise access points provide a feature to at least monitor for rouge access points and alert you if they see your SSID with an BSSID not from your access points. This helps but does not guard completely against it. To get the best protection against that attack you need to use EAP-TLS (certificates for every client – internal wifi setup) oder EAP-TTLS (certificate only for the RADIUS server and username/password for the client). But if the client does not validate the RADIUS server certificate (and there is no common name to check against, only the CA) you can’t prevent that attack, you need to monitor for it and act than.

Following measures can be taken to detect such access points on your network:

  • Compare MAC addresses against know vendor IDs. An Apple or Samsung vendor looks more like a mobile phone than a Cisco or Mikrotik one as a client in your hotspot.
  • Run an nmap finger print scan against new MAC addresses .. if the OS guess flags it as a WAP, or “Wireless Access”  take a look, also take a look at the open ports … telnet and ftp or snmp (with default community) are not common for phones. :-)
  • Look at the traffic with IDSes like Suricata for a X-Forwarded-For field and User-Agent strings associated with proxies
  • Detect when one IP address is presenting itself as multiple operating systems e.g. via different TTLs (Linux uses an different than Windows) .. Take a look at this paper and look also at this Linux netfilter module.

denial of service

Depending on the surrounding of your hotspots it is possible that an attacker wants to deny your customers the access to your public WiFi or use the attack to force the client to associate again with the access point to capture the session key. An easy way to do this is to send faked disassociation packets.  In 802.11w (rolled up in the 802.11-2012 maintenance release) a protection against this disassociation packets has been implemented and is called protected management frames. Check your access points for support of it. On the client side all modern Linux/BSD distributions support it, starting with Windows 8 the support is also enabled by default.

client 2 client traffic

There is commonly no need for one client to talk to an other client –> block that traffic. Sure you can and should put some text into your terms of service that the user should only connect the network with a secure system and that you’re not responsible for any attack, but there is no harm in providing the user with some additional security against direct attacks and ARP spoofing and there like. Many access points provide this feature, it is often called client isolation –> so that’s a quick win.

dhcp replies / answers

This is connected to filtering client 2 client traffic but I’ve seen that some access points block normal unicast traffic but let broadcast through. With such traffic an attacker can provide the target with an wrong IP address, which is often not filtered by the client isolation feature as it is not within the local subnet and so the access points does not think about it as local traffic. More detail on how I filter that traffic can be found here.

That was the wireless part – I hope it was informative – … the next part will go up the chain to Layer2&3 an application stuff. Stay tuned!

ps: If you’ve ideas to increase the security even more, post a comment! I’m sure I forgot something.

Mini Howto for a simple way to block a MAC address on Extreme Network switches

September 12, 2015

Yesterday I needed to block a MAC address on an Extreme Networks switch (XOS) … sure, I could write an ACL for this but there is a better way:

To block a MAC address:

create fdbentry aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff vlan <VlanName> blackhole

To unblock a MAC address:

delete fdbentry aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff vlan <VlanName> blackhole

Howto configure a TG588 from A1 Telekom as VDSL modem and a Mikrotik device as router

September 11, 2015

Our big nation provider A1 Telekom went ahead and provided our house as first provider with VDSL – hoped FTTH makes the race … but anyway VDSL is better than the old stuff I had before.  So I went ahead and ordered it and I got send an TG588 modem/router where you can almost configure nothing. e.g. UPNP is enabled and you can’t even deactivate it – when was it a good idea that a clients tells a firewall what to do in the first place? So I had to 3 options

  • Buy a VDSL router like FRITZ!Box 3390, which is also a home router where I don’t like the configuration methods and feature set
  • Buy a VDSL modem/bridge like Vigor130, and connect via a real router over pppoe. But the system is not on the A1 Telekom vectoring devices whitelist. No change for vectoring than ….
  • Get the TG588 to play only modem and let my real router to do pppoe tunnel.

As you most likely already guested I opt for the last one. This howto shows you how to configure the TG588 as modem and an Mikrotik router as router (could be any other devices that supports pppoe in client mode). I was not that easy to gather all this information and so it maybe helps others to save time.

First lets connect the TG588 to the telephone line and the Mikrotik with one interface (in my case ether0) to it. Let everything boot up and connect your PC to the Mikrotik clients ports (in the default config). Log into the Mikrotik and configure the interface to the modem like this:

/interface ethernet set [ find default-name=ether1 ] name=ether1vlanTransitModem
/ip address add address=10.0.0.1/24 interface=ether1vlanTransitModem network=10.0.0.0
/ip firewall nat add action=masquerade chain=srcnat comment="nat the traffic to the dsl modem web interface, only activate when needed" out-interface=ether1vlanTransitModem

This gives the interface a nice name, sets the IP address of that uplink interface and configures the router to perform an source NAT, so you’re able to configure the modem even if you’re behind the Mikrotik router.Make sure that there is not DHCP Client running on the Mikrotik (specially on the ether0 interface)

Now log into your TG588 by going to http://10.0.0.138.  Your default user has not the rights to change anything – so we need to change to an other default created user, with higher privileges. Click on the “admin” username:

tg588_1

Choose “change to other user”:

tg588_2

Provide following user data (worked at the time of writing, may got changed)

User: Telek0m

Password: Austria!Eur0

tg588_3

Now your user should have changed to following:

tg588_4

After that you will have more options to select from. Click onto “A1 WLAN Box” followed by “Configuration” and then choose “reconfigure A1 WLAN Box”

tg588_5a

On the following page you need to select “single user” mode and click on reconfigure

tg588_5

Now you’re done with the TG588 – after rebooting it should be fine. Now you need only following two pages on the TG588 – the rest is done by the Mikrotik router

First the event log, here you can check if something does not work:

tg588_6

And following page shows you the speed you’re connected with the provider network

tg588_7

The easy part

Now after all that clicking the Mikrotik part is easy:

/interface pppoe-client add add-default-route=yes disabled=no interface=ether1vlanTransitModem max-mru=1492 max-mtu=1492 mrru=disabled name=pppoeDslInternet password=XXXXXXXX use-peer-dns=no/yes user=XXXXXX

Replace XXXX with the data you got from A1 Telekom.

Now you’re internet connection should be up … test it with

ping 8.8.8.8

after that we only need some Firewall rules move the client traffic correctly to and from the Internet.

/ip firewall mangle add action=change-mss chain=forward comment="max MTU size for pppoe 1492" new-mss=1452 out-interface=pppoeDslInternet protocol=tcp tcp-flags=syn tcp-mss=!0-1452
/ip firewall nat add action=masquerade chain=srcnat comment="nat all traffic which goes over dsl into the internet" out-interface=pppoeDslInternet

Now you’re done. Hope this helped.

Beware: Extreme Networks EXOS ships with hidden SNMPv3 default admin user

July 28, 2015

Update:

Jan reported in the comments that the problem exists also with SNMPv2 – and that’s correct – Just didn’t see that as we’re using only SNMPv3

show configuration "snmp" detail

shows following

configure snmpv3 add community private name private user v1v2c_rw
configure snmpv3 add community public name public user v1v2c_ro

You need to delete that with:

configure snmpv3 del community private
configure snmpv3 del community public

Original article:

A college of mine just found something by performing security hardening on our Extreme Network switches (Thx for this!). We’ve moved away from SNMPv2 sometime ago and are using only SNMPv3. So as we did

disable snmp access snmp-v1v2c

and configured our own SNMPv3 users and we thoughed we’re safe. But that is not true even if typing

show configuration "snmp"

shows only your own users.  Typing

show configuration "snmp" detail     (detail = display all configuration data including default, otherwise default would not be displayed)

shows following

configure snmpv3 engine-id xxxxx
configure snmpv3 add user admin authentication md5 auth-encrypted hex 35:dc:03:fb:58:13:d3:54:92:0e:1d:fd:ab:3f:b5:9a privacy privacy-encrypted hex 35:dc:03:fb:58:13:d3:54:92:0e:1d:fd:ab:3f:b5:9a
configure snmpv3 add user initial
configure snmpv3 add user initialmd5 authentication md5 auth-encrypted hex 72:e7:51:a0:6b:37:81:a1:26:a5:f0:a1:b8:25:e6:b6
configure snmpv3 add user initialsha authentication sha auth-encrypted hex e9:9d:30:c1:6a:bf:21:45:7e:20:e4:ff:14:2e:28:5f:9c:2e:f3:30
configure snmpv3 add user initialmd5Priv authentication md5 auth-encrypted hex d1:67:eb:88:85:19:4d:7b:c7:09:a4:d4:d5:ba:21:eb privacy privacy-encrypted hex d1:67:eb:88:85:19:4d:7b:c7:09:a4:d4:d5:ba:21:eb
configure snmpv3 add user initialshaPriv authentication sha auth-encrypted hex 34:1d:66:c1:a2:ba:4d:26:8a:da:f5:f6:00:2a:e6:04:88:47:f0:4c privacy privacy-encrypted hex 34:1d:66:c1:a2:ba:4d:26:8a:da:f5:f6:00:2a:e6:04:88:47:f0:4c
configure snmpv3 add group v1v2c_ro user v1v2c_ro sec-model snmpv1
configure snmpv3 add group v1v2c_rw user v1v2c_rw sec-model snmpv1
configure snmpv3 add group v1v2c_ro user v1v2c_ro sec-model snmpv2c
configure snmpv3 add group v1v2c_rw user v1v2c_rw sec-model snmpv2c
configure snmpv3 add group v1v2cNotifyGroup user v1v2cNotifyUser1 sec-model snmpv2c
configure snmpv3 add group v1v2cNotifyGroup user v1v2cNotifyUser2 sec-model snmpv2c
configure snmpv3 add group admin user admin sec-model usm
configure snmpv3 add group initial user initial sec-model usm
configure snmpv3 add group initial user initialmd5 sec-model usm
configure snmpv3 add group initial user initialsha sec-model usm
configure snmpv3 add group initial user initialmd5Priv sec-model usm
configure snmpv3 add group initial user initialshaPriv sec-model usm
configure snmpv3 add access admin sec-model usm sec-level priv read-view defaultAdminView write-view defaultAdminView notify-view defaultNotifyView
configure snmpv3 add access initial sec-model usm sec-level noauth read-view defaultUserView notify-view defaultNotifyView
configure snmpv3 add access initial sec-model usm sec-level authnopriv read-view defaultUserView write-view defaultUserView notify-view defaultNotifyView
configure snmpv3 add access v1v2c_ro sec-model snmpv1 sec-level noauth read-view defaultUserView notify-view defaultNotifyView
configure snmpv3 add access v1v2c_ro sec-model snmpv2c sec-level noauth read-view defaultUserView notify-view defaultNotifyView
configure snmpv3 add access v1v2c_rw sec-model snmpv1 sec-level noauth read-view defaultUserView write-view defaultUserView notify-view defaultNotifyView
configure snmpv3 add access v1v2c_rw sec-model snmpv2c sec-level noauth read-view defaultUserView write-view defaultUserView notify-view defaultNotifyView
configure snmpv3 add access snmpv3group sec-model usm sec-level priv read-view defaultAdminView write-view None notify-view None
configure snmpv3 add access v1v2cNotifyGroup sec-model snmpv1 sec-level noauth notify-view defaultNotifyView
configure snmpv3 add access v1v2cNotifyGroup sec-model snmpv2c sec-level noauth notify-view defaultNotifyView
....
enable snmp access
disable snmp access snmp-v1v2c
enable snmp access snmpv3
enable snmpv3 default-group
enable snmpv3 default-user
enable snmp traps
configure snmp compatibility ip-fragmentation disallow
enable snmp access vr VR-Default
enable snmp access vr VR-Mgmt

Oh my god what are these users? A check into the manual (one of 1732 pages) shows following:

snmpv3defaultuser

Yes, these are all default users, with published passwords – and sure it works as following shows:

$ snmpwalk -u admin -A password -a MD5 -X password -x DES -l authPriv switchIpAddress -v3
iso.3.6.1.2.1.1.1.0 = STRING: "ExtremeXOS (X450e-48p) version 15.3.4.6 v1534b6-patch1-8 by release-manager on Thu Oct 30 13:07:09 EDT 2014"
iso.3.6.1.2.1.1.2.0 = OID: iso.xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
.....

I really don’t know what the engineers smoked when they put default SNMPv3 users into the switch configuration! Whats the purpose? And then hiding them from show configuration! What do you need to do to fix this?

disable snmpv3 default-group
disable snmpv3 default-user

Now you get:

$ snmpwalk -u admin -A password -a MD5 -X password -x DES -l authPriv switchIpAddress -v3
Error in packet.
Reason: authorizationError (access denied to that object)

If you delete the users additionally with following commands:

configure snmpv3 delete user admin
configure snmpv3 delete user initial
configure snmpv3 delete user initialmd5
configure snmpv3 delete user initialsha
configure snmpv3 delete user initialmd5Priv
configure snmpv3 delete user initialshaPriv

You’ll get:

$ snmpwalk -u admin -A password -a MD5 -X password -x DES -l authPriv switchIpAddress -v3
snmpwalk: Unknown user name

I recommend deleting every configuration line (be it user or group) you don’t need. Only 2 lines protect you otherwise from a completely open switch …. some firmware did make the switch to forget a config line (e.g. when the syntax changed) … so lets be more save by also removing the users.

Looking for a way to change an email address and found clear text admin password

July 9, 2015

Today I wanted to change the email address of my admin User in the Unifi management software. As I couldn’t find anything in the GUI I started to look into the mongodb, which I’m already familiar with as I needed it for the last fix described here. So the part of changing the email was quite simple .. I just did that:

# /usr/bin/mongo --port 27117
MongoDB shell version: 2.6.10
connecting to: 127.0.0.1:27117/test
> use ace
switched to db ace
> db.admin.find()
{ "_id" : ObjectId("YYYYYYYYYYYYY"), "name" : "admin", "lang" : "en_US", "x_password" : "XXXXXXXXX", "email_alert_enabled" : true, "email" : "[email protected]" }
> db.admin.update({"_id" : ObjectId("YYYYYYYYYYYYY")}, { $set: {"email" : "[email protected]"}})
WriteResult({ "nMatched" : 1, "nUpserted" : 0, "nModified" : 1 })
> db.admin.find()
{ "_id" : ObjectId("YYYYYYYYYYYYY"), "name" : "admin", "lang" : "en_US", "x_password" : "XXXXXXX", "email_alert_enabled" : true, "email" : "[email protected]" }
>

But as you see there is a field x_password with the admin password in the clear. What the heck? Why that, this is only needed for login on, the device password can be set per site.  So I searched in the internet that someone else found it – and yes, this was reported to the vendor over a year ago.

Unifi upgrade 2.4.6 to 3.2.10: maps not working

July 8, 2015

So after the migration itself worked and I’ve updated the access points I looked into the problem that my maps did not work anymore. Every map showed only white and I was not able to add new maps. After long googling I found part of the answer here.  My solution is a bit different and works on the fly:

  1. Unifi management needs to be running
  2. check where your mongod is running … on my system its ports 27117
    # netstat -pnl | grep mongod
    tcp 0 0 127.0.0.1:27117 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 16760/bin/mongod
  3. login with /usr/bin/mongo --port 27117
  4. and type following
  5. use ace followed by db.map.chunks.dropIndex("files_id_1_n_1")
  6. choose a new map in the drop down box and it should work again

the full communication looks like this:

# /usr/bin/mongo --port 27117
MongoDB shell version: 2.6.10
connecting to: 127.0.0.1:27117/test
> use ace
switched to db ace
> db.map.chunks.dropIndex("files_id_1_n_1")
{ "nIndexesWas" : 2, "ok" : 1 }
>
bye

Unifi upgrade 2.4.6 to 3.2.10: exception: remove needs a query at src/mongo/shell/collection.js

If you try to upgrade Ubiquiti Networks Unifi system from version 2.4.6 to 3.2.10 it is possible that you’ll run into following problem:

Exception in thread "launcher" org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanCreationException: Error creating bean with name 'class.super': Instantiation of bean failed; nested exception is org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanDefinitionStoreException: Factory method [public final com.ubnt.A.new.B com.ubnt.A.new$$EnhancerByCGLIB$$ad7756e2.class.super()] threw exception; nested exception is org.springframework.beans.factory.BeanCreationException: Error creating bean with name 'Ø00000': Invocation of init method failed; nested exception is com.mongodb.CommandResult$CommandFailure: command failed [$eval]: { "serverUsed" : "/127.0.0.1:27117" , "errmsg" : "exception: remove needs a query at src/mongo/shell/collection.js:299" , "code" : 16722 , "ok" : 0.0}

when trying to start it like this

/usr/bin/java -jar /opt/UniFi/lib/ace.jar start

Searching through the Internet shows that more people have the problem but a working solution is not posted anywhere. So here is it:

The reason for the problem is quit easily found here. Basically the syntax of the command is not correct. So I started to search through the lib directory for a file that contains this incorrect string. It is within /opt/UniFi/lib/ace.jar so I installed the jar command line utility (on Centos 6)

yum install java-1.7.0-openjdk-devel

and extracted all files to search in which it was. As I found it, its easier for you just type:

jar xf ace.jar com/ubnt/A/ooOO/OOoO.class

Now you need a Java class editor – we use this Java one. Download and extract it and start it like this:

java -jar ce.jar

Now you need to find and change the values:

  1. Click on “Constant Pool”
  2. Type db.cache_device.remove in the search field and find the line 459
  3. Activate the “Modify Mode” and change the values

classeditor

In the end it should look like this (the second one is a link to the fist,  just update):

classeditor2

Now save the file and update the jar file:

jar uf ace.jar com/ubnt/A/ooOO/OOoO.class

Now a restart and migration should work. Hope this helps others .. it took me one hour to find my solution, so I hope its now faster for you. 😉

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